Sep
9
Wed
2020
When Women Won the Right to Vote: An American Fiction @ Online via Zoom, Register at link below
Sep 9 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Dr. Lisa Tetrault, Carnegie Mellon University, author of The Myth of Seneca Falls will present this Zoom lecture (link information coming soon) followed by a Q & A session sponsored by the UNCG History Department and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program.

When women won passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, they did not win the right to vote, despite repeated claims that they did.

Just what, then, did the woman suffrage amendment do?  Clarifying this history, this talk also positions 1920 as the middle of a much larger story about the pursuit of voting rights, a struggle that remains unfinished and ongoing.

Webinar Registration Link

Sep
25
Fri
2020
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Joan Titus @ Online via Zoom
Sep 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

    The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Joan Titus is an associate professor of Musicology/Ethnomusicology at UNCG and her lecture is titled “Gender and Music in Dmitry Shostakovich’s Scores for Late Stalinist Films.”

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Sep
30
Wed
2020
An Evening with the Creative Class @ Webinar (please see details below)
Sep 30 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

An Evening with the Creative Class Flyer

The UNCG School of Dance and Evening with the Creative Class present:

The Resistance Project: Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business.

This event includes two moderated webinar and artist forums led by Professor Duane Cyrus from the UNCG School of Dance on Wednesday, September 30, 2020 and March 24, 2021 from  7:00-9:00 pm.

A link to the webinar will be provided closer to the date.  For more information contact Professor Cyrus at: dacyrus@uncg.edu

The Resistance Project: Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business highlights women artists, scholars, entrepreneurs, and activists from the African Diaspora with empowered artwork, community engagement, performance, and development workshops.

An Evening with the Creative Class is an ongoing series of informal presentations and discussions on the arts with a panel of curated guest artists and scholars sharing their talent in an enriching evening of community, networking, and discussion. This year’s theme is Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business.

This event is open to the general public free of charge.

Oct
6
Tue
2020
A Revolution of Their Own: The Ottoman Women’s Movement @ TBD
Oct 6 all-day
Dr. Didem Havlıoğlu
Dr. Didem Havlıoğlu

Dr. Havlıoğlu (Ph.D Univ. of Washington) will give a talk on the Ottoman women’s movement through various contemporary sources such as the genre of women’s magazines in the late Ottoman/early Turkish republic period. 

Dr. Havlıoğlu’s work is on gender and sexuality in the early modern Ottoman world. She is particularly interested in women poets and writers and their ways of appropriating the traditional discourse. She has written both in Turkish in English about Ottoman women writers from early modern to Modern periods. Her book project, titled “Mihri Hatun: Performance, Gender-bending and Subversion,” is a study of the first Ottoman woman poet who managed to collect her poetry and achieved unprecedented success in literary circles of her time. This event is free and open to the public.

Oct
16
Fri
2020
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Dr. Jessica Swanston Baker @ Online via Zoom
Oct 16 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Dr. Jessica Swanston Baker is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago and her lecture is titled “Armed with Sound: Noisy Women and the Beginning of the West Indies Labor Movement.”

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Nov
15
Sun
2020
Play Like a Girl: Faculty Chamber Concert @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Nov 15 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Nine female musicians from School of Music
Front Row: Dr. Ashley Barret, oboe, Dr. Carla LeFevre Second Row: Dr. Teri Bickham, Prof. Clara O’Brien, Dr. Erika Boysen, flute, Dr. Abigail Pack, French Horn Back Row: Dr. Marjorie Bagley, violin, Dr. Rebecca Libera, bassoon, Dr. Annie Jeng, piano

Faculty members in UNCG’s School of Music will kick off their “Play Like a Girl” tour with a chamber music concert that celebrates the power of the female spirit. Unique instrumental and vocal combinations will be performed by exciting composers including: Missy Mazoli, Annika Socolofsky, Kaija Saariaho, Julia Wolfe, Tania Leon, Gabriela Lena Frank, Pauline Oliveros, Chen Yi, and Laura Kaminsky. The breadth of experiences represented by these composers presents an important platform to promote and explore the empowerment of women through music. This event is free and open to the public.

Jan
1
Fri
2021
Votes for Women: Why Did It Take So Long? Why Did It Happen So Suddenly? An Atlantic World Lunchtime Colloquium @ Moore Humanities & Research Administration Building
Jan 1 all-day

“Votes for Women: Why Did It Take So Long? Why Did It Happen So Suddenly?”

POSTPONED-Date and Time TBA in Spring or Early Fall 2021

Our featured historians, Lisa Tetrault of Carnegie Mellon University and Elsa Barkley Brown of the University of Maryland, will lead an Atlantic World Lunchtime Colloquium for approximately 30 invited interdisciplinary participants on the topic of “Votes for Women: Why Did It Take So Long? Why Did It Happen So Suddenly?” considering the factors that moved women’s political empowerment–largely unthinkable through  most of recorded world history–from impossible to inevitable in the space of a century in the Western world.

A box lunch will be provided for all by the Atlantic World Research Network. This event is by invitation only, please email awrn@uncg.edu to reserve your space.

 

Jan
22
Fri
2021
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Julie Hubbert @ Please see details below
Jan 22 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Julie Hubbert is an Associate Professor of Musicology and Film/Media Studies at the University of South Carolina and her lecture is titled “Music, New Hollywood Women, and the ERA.”

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Feb
4
Thu
2021
The Bureau of Personal Belonging, Artist’s Talk by Stacey L. Kirby @ Public Lecture
Feb 4 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Two people taking an oath
Stacey L. Kirby performing in The Bureau of Personal Belonging with community performers at ArtPrize 8 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Photo by Alex Maness.

Artist Stacey L. Kirby brings The Bureau of Personal Belonging to UNCG’s campus and to downtown Greensboro to provide a vehicle for a dialogue on citizenship, identity, and human rights through ‘performative interactions’—performances set within artist installations activated by viewer participation. Kirby will create an art installation and immersive performances at UNCG’s Greensboro Project Space (GPS) from February 15-26 that utilizes bureaucratic forms, papers, postures, language, and aesthetics to immerse participants in questions around citizenship and civil authority.

Registration page available through the Weatherspoon Art Museum Website:

https://weatherspoonart.org/event-feb-4-artist-talk-stacey-kirby/

This event is co-sponsored by the Weatherspoon Art Museum, UNCG School of Art, and the Humanities Network and Consortium (HNAC) at UNCG.

 

Feb
5
Fri
2021
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Yayoi Uno Everett @ Please see details below
Feb 5 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Yayoi Uno Everett is a Professor of Music Theory at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Her lecture topic is On Kaija Saariaho and her opera Only the Sound Remains (2017).

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Feb
15
Mon
2021
The Bureau of Personal Belonging, Art Installation and Immersive Performance @ 111 E. February One Place, UNCG Greensboro Project Space, Greensboro NC 27401
Feb 15 @ 5:30 pm – Feb 26 @ 7:30 pm
Two people taking an oath
Stacey L. Kirby performing in The Bureau of Personal Belonging with community performers at ArtPrize 8 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Photo by Alex Maness.

Immersive Performance Dates:  February 17th, 20th, 23rd, and 26th

Reservations Through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-bureau-of-personal-belonging-registration-135366728529

Artist Stacey L. Kirby brings The Bureau of Personal Belonging to UNCG’s campus and to downtown Greensboro to provide a vehicle for a dialogue on citizenship, identity, and human rights through ‘performative interactions’ – performances set within artist installations activated by viewer participation. Kirby will create an interactive work at UNCG’s Greensboro Project Space (GPS) that utilizes bureaucratic forms, papers, postures, language and aesthetics to immerse participants in questions around citizenship and civil authority.

 

Feb
26
Fri
2021
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Jocelyn Neal @ Please see details below
Feb 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Jocelyn Neal is a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor of Music at UNC Chapel Hill and her lecture topic is “Singing Your Own Songs: How Female Songwriters Navigate Intellectual Property and Public Authenticity.” 

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Mar
21
Sun
2021
O Blissful Loss of Self: Explorations of Ecstasy in the Music and Poetry of Women @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Mar 21 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
Dylan Reddish
Dylan Reddish
Anima Vox
Carole Ott Coelho and Tadeu Coelho

Ecstatic poetry, characterized by experiences of selflessness, suspension of time, and physical or spiritual rapture, has a long and deep tradition throughout many cultures in the world. Women’s voices of ecstasy have historically been silenced, dismissed, or forgotten. This project will explore, celebrate, and reclaim women’s poetic voices and experiences of ecstasy throughout history through a musical commission, a call for compositions by female composers, and free improvisation by flute and soprano duo, Anima Vox (Carole Ott Coelho and Tadeu Coelho) in collaboration with dancer/choreographer Dylan Reddish. As part of the She Can We Can celebration at UNCG, Anima Vox will premier Poemas eróticos by Mexican composer Adriana Romero, perform award winning compositions written specifically for this project, and create an improvised work based on the poetry of women’s rights activist Muna Lee.

For more information, please visit www.animavoxduo.com.

Mar
24
Wed
2021
An Evening with the Creative Class @ Webinar, please see details below
Mar 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

An Evening with the Creative Class Flyer

The UNCG School of Dance and Evening with the Creative Class present:

The Resistance Project: Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business.

This event includes two moderated webinar and artist forums led by Professor Duane Cyrus from the UNCG School of Dance on Wednesday, Sept 30, 2020 and March 24, 2021 from 7:00-9:00 pm.

A link to the webinar will be provided closer to the date.  For more information contact Professor Cyrus at: dacyrus@uncg.edu

The Resistance Project: Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business highlights women artists, scholars, entrepreneurs, and activists from the African Diaspora with empowered artwork, community engagement, performance, and development workshops.

An Evening with the Creative Class is an ongoing series of informal presentations and discussions on the arts with a panel of curated guest artists and scholars sharing their talent in an enriching evening of community, networking, and discussion. This year’s theme is Women of the African Diaspora––Activism in Art, Education, and Business.

This event is open to the general public free of charge.

Mar
26
Fri
2021
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series presents Yun Emily Wang @ Please see details below
Mar 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Yun Emily Wang, Assistant Professor Ethnomusicology, Duke University (Starting Fall 2020) will lecture on “Sounding ‘Homes’ and Making Do in Sinophone Toronto.” 

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Apr
1
Thu
2021
Planting Resistance: African Feminist Blueprints for Climate Justice @ TBA
Apr 1 all-day

Date TBA

Shailja Patel is a poet, performer, and activist with a long history of making socially conscious art and working in social movement collectives rooted in feminist and decolonial practices. She is the author of the genre-bending book Migritude (Kaya Press, 2010) based on her performance by the same name; a project she describes as telling a “history from the boot print of empire — history written by the victims and survivors … those at the bottom, not the top.”

Author, Shailja Patel
Author, Shailja Patel Photo credit: Christopher Holmback

During her visit to UNCG, she will read from her current book project on the neglected histories and contemporary contributions of African women to the global climate justice movement. The event is supported through generous funding from the “She Can, We Can” grant with additional contributions from the African American and African Diaspora Studies program, the English department, the International and Global Studies program, and the Lloyd International Honors College.

A reception will follow with light refreshments served.

Apr
15
Thu
2021
Voices for Reproductive Justice @ UNCG Campus, McIver Building
Apr 15 all-day

She Can We Can logo “Voices for Reproductive Justice, “ a university-community partnership sponsored symposium, highlights the application of a social justice and health equity approach to reproductive health. Historically, reproductive health advocates have applied a narrower, rights-based framework that focuses on bodily autonomy and has privileged the voices of white, middle-class women.

Reproductive justice, defined as the “right to maintain personal bodily autonomy, have children, not have children, and parent the children we have in safe and sustainable communities,” shifts that focus by applying an equity lens, broadening the health-related issues addressed, and centering diverse voices. This day-long symposium will include presentations, focused discussions, and performances around the defining issues within reproductive justice. National and regional leaders and scholars in the field will interrogate current and historical narratives of reproductive health from diverse perspectives. The symposium will also introduce emerging scholars’ research and the work of community leaders. ALL voices–joined together. 

Apr
16
Fri
2021
The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series Presents Nina Eidsheim @ Please see details below
Apr 16 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Professor Nina Eidsheim head shot
Professor Nina Eidsheim

The Irna Priore Music and Culture Lecture Series is a series that showcases scholars of music studies and hosted by the Musicology/Ethnomusicology and Music Theory Areas of the UNCG School of Music. For the Academic Year 2020–2021, the IPMCLS will feature several speakers from across the country, who will lecture on a range of topics concerning women, gender, music, and civil/human rights over the past 100 years.

Nina Eidsheim is a Professor of Musicology at UCLA and her lecture is titled “Ime mean, I knewknow I’m was kinda tall for highasking: How We Teach Machines to Listen for Race.”

Lectures in Fall 2020 will be held online via Zoom, while lectures in Spring 2021 will be held either online or in the Music Building (100 McIver). All lectures are free and open to the public. A light reception will follow each lecture if it is held on campus. For online registration, abstracts, and general information about the Series, see https://vpa.uncg.edu/music/priore-mcls/ .

Aug
1
Sun
2021
“The Legacy of Fatima: Gender, Succession and Inheritance in Medieval Shi‘ism” A lecture by Dr. Alyssa Gabbay, UNCG (Date TBA) @ TBD
Aug 1 all-day

Shy, retiring, and doomed to an early death – Fatima, daughter of the Prophet Muhammad, hardly seems the stuff of feminist icons. Yet her legacy provided an important precedent for tracing lineage through both females and males, a matter of great consequence for the status of women in Islam. In this talk, Alyssa Gabbay examines Shi‘i interpretations of the Qur’an and other scriptural sources that affirm Fatima’s offspring as part of her lineage, not that of her husband, ‘Ali. This affirmation led to more egalitarian inheritance practices in Shi‘ism and even opened the door to female succession, among other consequences. 

Alyssa Gabbay is Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she also co-directs the Islamic Studies Research Network. Her most recent book is Gender and Succession in Medieval and Early Modern Islam: Bilateral Descent and the Legacy of Fatima (London: I.B. Tauris/Bloomsbury, 2020). Gabbay is the recipient of the Candace Bernard and Robert Glickman Dean’s Professorship in the College of Arts and Sciences of UNCG and the Foundation for Iranian Studies’ Best Ph.D. Dissertation on a Topic of Iranian Studies award, among other honors.

100+ Years of Active Women and Activism: Physical Culture from Woman’s College to UNCG @ TBA
Aug 1 all-day
Women doing calisthenics in 1910
1910 Calisthenics Class

DATE TBA

Since the establishment of the Department of Physiology and Physical Culture (1892; now Department of Kinesiology), UNCG has spearheaded the view that women should be physically active to improve their health and wellness. The University was the leader of sport and physical activity promotion for women in the South from its founding (1891) through its time as the Woman’s College of UNC (1932-1963). Informed by university archives and recently conducted interviews with alumni, retired faculty, and current students/faculty, this panel event will highlight women’s activism in and through physical activity spaces over the past 100 years on our campus, spanning the early years of the “Coleman era” (1920-1947) to the increasingly diverse landscape of women in physical activity at UNCG today (2020+).

Women dancing in a choreography class in 2019
Lynn Hey photo

 

A Century of Votes for Women: American Elections Since Suffrage @ Weatherspoon Art Museum Auditorium
Aug 1 all-day
Christina Wolbrecht
October 10, 2019; Christina Wolbrecht (Photo by Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)

DATE TBA

How have American women voted in the first 100 years since the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment? How have popular understandings of women as voters both persisted and changed over time? Christina Wolbrecht offers an unprecedented account of women voters in American politics over the last ten decades. Bringing together new and existing data, she and her coauthor, J. Kevin Corder, provide unique insight into women’s (and men’s) voting behavior, and trace how women’s turnout and vote choice evolved across a century of enormous transformation overall and for women in particular. 

 

An Evening with Natasha Tretheway, Former U.S. Poet Laureate and Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry @ Alumni House, Virginia Dare Room
Aug 1 all-day
Natasha Tretheway head shot
Natasha Tretheway

DATE TBA

The UNCG Graduate Program in Creative Writing will host a reading by former U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey in the UNCG Alumni House. The event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a reception and book signing. Trethewey is the author of five collections of poetry, Monument, which was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award; Thrall; Native Guard, for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, Bellocq’s Ophelia; and Domestic Work, winner of the inaugural Cave Canem Poetry Prize for the best first book by an African American poet and won both the 2001 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Book Prize and the 2001 Lillian Smith Award for Poetry. She is also the author of the memoir Memorial Drive. She is a Board of Trustees Professor of English At Northwestern University.

CeCe McDonald on Prison Abolition and the Future of Trans Activism @ TBA
Aug 1 all-day
CeCe McDonald
CeCe McDonald

DATE TBA

This event is the last in a three part series included in What’s the T? Making Space for Transgender Lives on Campus and Beyond.

CeCe McDonald shares profoundly affecting stories from her life as a trans woman of color and hate crime survivor, while inspiring audiences to stand up for acceptance, justice and equality. CeCe is a transgender activist and revered icon of the LGBTQ community. She captured international recognition in 2011 after surviving a white supremacist and trans phobic attack, later receiving a second-degree manslaughter conviction and serving 19 months in prison simply for defending herself. Today, CeCe fosters important conversations around mass incarceration, sexuality, and violence. With energy and conviction, she highlights the hope she now fights for – that all LGBTQ people can live their lives free of hate and prejudice and confidently pursue their dreams without fear.

Deaf Women Can: Then and Now Community Event @ EUC Auditorium
Aug 1 all-day

Melissa Malzkuhn headshot

DATE TBA

Local, state and national Deaf women will share their experiences in ‘TED Talk’ fashion. Nationally known activist, academic, artist and digital strategist Melissa Malzkuhn headlines the event and is joined by a variety of other notable women who are deaf or hard of hearing.

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow immediately after the event.

Deaf Women Can: Then and Now K-12 School Event @ School of Education Building
Aug 1 all-day
Melissa Malzkuhn headshot
Melissa Malzkuhn

DATE TBA

More than 80% of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students are educated within the public-school system today, with most of them having little or no access to Deaf culture, Deaf history or Deaf role models and many never even seeing a DHH adult until they themselves become one. Further, Deaf culture and history parallels the larger society’s repression of women and their contributions.  In light of this history and to change the future, we present Deaf Women Can:  Then and Now, an event showcasing the varied achievements of Deaf Women throughout history to present day.  Area deaf and hard of hearing students will travel to UNCG to learn about these successful Deaf women from throughout history while engaging with UNCG Professions in Deafness majors, escape room style!  They will also have the chance to meet and interact with nationally known Deaf storyteller, Melissa Malzkuhn, as she shares her storytelling apps with them.

Event is by invitation only, email lballen@uncg.edu to receive an invitation.

 

Documenting Local Women Politicians: An Oral History Project @ Available on UNCG Digital Collections Page
Aug 1 all-day

She Can We Can logo

DATE TBA

This project is the first attempt to document women politicians on a local and regional level in Greensboro. We will conduct up to 10 oral history interviews with women in Greensboro who either currently hold or have held in the past elected office. The interviewees will be selected from across party lines. Interviews will focus on each woman’s personal and political history, allowing us to document and make available to researchers the women’s experiences in their own words. Each oral history will be made available to the public through the UNCG Digital Collections page.

Don Quixote @ Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra

Dmitry Sitkovetsky, conductor
Yura Lee, viola
Zlatomir Fung, cello
Mozart Sinfonia concertante in A Major, K. 104
Mozart Sinfonia concertante in E-flat Major, K. 364
Strauss Don Quixote

Welcome the new year with a study in contrasts: the sinfonia concertante is a musical genre that puts multiple soloists in contrast with an orchestra. Cellist Zlatomir Fung and violist Yura Lee join Maestro Sitkovetsky for sinfonie concertanti by Mozart, then portray the naïve adventurer Don Quixote and his sidekick Sancho Panza for Richard Strauss’ own spin on the form.

Elizabeth Rowe: A Voice for Gender Equity and Advocacy – Moderated Discussion @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

Less than one week after an updated Massachusetts Equal Pay Act went into effect on July 1, 2018, Elizabeth Rowe, principal flutist of the Boston Symphony, filed a gender pay discrimination suit against the orchestra. This lawsuit ignited national and international conversation regarding gender bias in classical music, an institution that is historically male-dominated.

Elizabeth Rowe
Elizabeth Rowe

Ms. Rowe will be featured in a moderated discussion and in concert with UNCG students on (dates TBA), respectively. Additionally, she will teach an orchestral audition masterclass for UNCG.

Elizabeth Rowe: A Voice for Gender Equity and Advocacy – Orchestral Audition Masterclass @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day
Elizabeth Rowe
Elizabeth Rowe

DATE TBA

Less than one week after an updated Massachusetts Equal Pay Act went into effect on July 1, 2018, Elizabeth Rowe, principal flutist of the Boston Symphony, filed a gender pay discrimination suit against the orchestra. This lawsuit ignited national and international conversation regarding gender bias in classical music, an institution that is historically male-dominated. 

Ms. Rowe will be featured in a moderated discussion and in concert with UNCG students on (Dates TBA), respectively. Additionally, she will teach an orchestral audition masterclass for UNCG.

Elizabeth Rowe: A Voice for Gender Equity and Advocacy – Recital @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day
Elizabeth Rowe
Elizabeth Rowe

DATE TBA

Less than one week after an updated Massachusetts Equal Pay Act went into effect on July 1, 2018, Elizabeth Rowe, principal flutist of the Boston Symphony, filed a gender pay discrimination suit against the orchestra. This lawsuit ignited national and international conversation regarding gender bias in classical music, an institution that is historically male-dominated. 

Ms. Rowe will be featured in a moderated discussion and in concert with UNCG students on (Dates TBA), respectively. Additionally, she will teach an orchestral audition masterclass for UNCG.

Ella Puede, Nosotros Podemos. Towards Equity and Hope in Immigration Issues @ EUC Auditorium
Aug 1 all-day
Cecilia Ayon

DATE TBA

In the spirit of  the centennial of the women’s suffrage movement, we highlight one of the civil rights issues of our day: the inequities experienced by immigrants, children of immigrants and immigrant communities. A keynote address will be delivered by Cecilia Ayón, Ph.D.Associate Professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Riverside whose impactful work examines factors that promote or hinder the well-being of Latino immigrant families. The keynote will be followed by a panel discussion and social hour with leaders of local immigrant-serving organizations. Ella Puede, Nosotros Podemos event will be complemented by workshop activities for UNCG undergraduate students throughout the day. Event is free and open to the public. All Greensboro community members are welcome and encouraged to attend. ¡Todos están bienvenidos!

Embracing the Rise of the Unconventional Woman @ TBD
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

This will be an interdisciplinary speaker and discussion panel that will explore traditionally non-normative life choices, and the significance and impact of such choices, on the lives of women. Hosted by Dr. Janet Boseovski (UNCG Psychology), the panel will bring together speakers who will discuss childfree living (Dr. Amy Blackstone, University of Maine), cohabitation and hookups (Dr. Arielle Kuperberg, UNCG Sociology), firefighting and powerlifting (Hannah Johnson, Greensboro), and careers in trades  (Pam Frye, Frye Build and Design, Greensboro). Visit the Department of Psychology website for more event information.

Amy Blackstone
Dr. Amy Blackstone
Janet Boseovski headshot
Dr. Janet Boseovski
Feeling Between the Times: Trans of Color Temporalities, and Respect After Death @ Elliott University Center Alexander Room
Aug 1 all-day
Dr. Jacob Lau, PhD
Dr. Jacob Lau

DATE TBA

Part two of the three part series of What’s the T? Making Space for Transgender Lives on Campus and Beyond.

Feeling Between the Times: Trans of Color Temporalities, and Respect After Death is grounded in queer of color critique and postcolonial approaches in historicism. This talk utilizes Dr. Lau’s methodology of trans-temporality to navigate the archives of mixed race Chinese American trans man Christopher Lee. Lee was one of the first filmmakers documenting trans masculine people of color in the Bay Area, he co-founded the San Francisco Transgender Film Festival in 1997, and his misgendering after death sparked the passage of California’s Respect After Death Act (2014) allowing for the revision of gender identity makers on death certificates posthumously. Dr. Lau will read Lee’s auto-ethnographic documentary Christopher’s Chronicles – Chapter 1 (1996) trans-temporally, demonstrating how dissenting narratives within the film align with legacies of Asian American Critique, refusing and contesting a reliance on legibility and visibility as processes for trans of color acceptance and safety.

 

Guilford County Family Justice Center 101 @ Guilford County Family Justice Center Auditorium
Aug 1 all-day

Family Justice Center 101 Flyer

DATE TBA

Learn how the Guilford County Family Justice Center is transforming our community’s response to domestic violence, sexual assault, child maltreatment, and elder abuse. In partnership with UNC Greensboro’s She Can, We Can initiative, learn how UNC Greensboro researchers and students have partnered with the FJC from its beginning through today. This program will include information about the services provided through the FJC, how partnerships work within the FJC and in the broader community, and how the FJC strives to be a beacon of hope for victims and survivors of abuse. Following the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to tour the FJC facility in Greensboro.

Register at tickets link above.

Heather Headley @ Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra
Evan Feldman, conductor
Heather Headley, vocals

Heather Headley
Heather Headley

Tony and GRAMMY Award Winner and one of Broadway’s brightest stars, Heather Headley will perform hits from The Lion King, Elton John, and Tim Rice’s Aïda!

 

MARISOL by José Rivera @ Taylor Theatre
Aug 1 all-day

Cosmic chaos erupts in this apocalyptic comedy of urban realities and guardian angels. Marisol Perez, a young single professional woman living in the asphalt jungle of the Bronx, finds herself sucked into a whirlpool of homelessness, violence and racism when her guardian angel deserts her to fight in what may be the final battle in heaven. —Playbill.com

Winner of the 1993 Obie Award. An apocalyptic urban fantasy which urges society to ‘wake up’ and somehow find a way to recover the long-lost and much-needed compassion for our fellow man, as this is the only way to save our world.” —Dramatists Play Service

…Rivera’s cruelly slanted world view…is fascinating.” —NY Post

An urban nightmare that grows increasingly bleaker for its young heroine, “Marisol” is a dark fantasia that reflects a number of the social and spiritual troubles of the early 1990s.” — The New York Times

Marisol is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

Age Rating: PG-13 for mature content

Run Time: Approx. 1 hr. and 30 min., including a 15-min. intermission

Post-Show Discussion: TBA

Sign Interpreted Performance: TBA

 

Minerva’s Wisdom @ Minerva Statue on UNCG Campus @ Minerva Statue on UNCG Campus
Aug 1 all-day
Group pic in front of Minerva statue
Class picture with James Barnhill, sculptor of the Minerva Statue

DATE TBA

“Minerva’s Wisdom” is a year-long campus-wide interactive photography project that involves the participation of students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Photos will be taken of any member of the campus community in an elegantly-designed Minerva helmet who will be asked to briefly share a piece of their wisdom. Photos will be part of an exhibit on campus and online. A photo essay book will be produced with images and accompanying phrases. The project is designed to have maximal positive campus-wide impact, in the spirit of being welcoming of the range of views of members of the campus community. It democratizes what wisdom means with an understanding that one can learn from anyone–and everyone has something to give and teach. This inclusive posture democratizes who speaks and what they have to say, tied to the university’s symbol. In this way, we are all Minerva and Minerva is all of us.

North Carolina Jazz Girls Day- Date TBD @ UNCG Recital Hall, Music Building
Aug 1 all-day

She Can We Can logoThis day will be made up of rehearsals, workshops, lectures, and mentoring which will culminate in an evening concert. Come out to hear some swinging music!

Queens of Soul @ Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts
Aug 1 all-day

Greensboro Symphony

DATE TBA

Hits by the reigning divas of Soul and R&B: Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Patti LaBelle, Gladys Knight, Nina Simone, Whitney Houston, Jennifer Hudson, Amy Winehouse, Alicia Keys and Adele.

 

SAINT JOAN by George Bernard Shaw @ Taylor Theatre
Aug 1 all-day

Saint Joan is Bernard Shaw’s greatest play. At its center is the most remarkable teenage girl in history. But who is she? The divinely-inspired savior of France? A dangerously clever charlatan? Or a pathetically deluded country girl? It all depends on your point of view. Whatever she is, eventually Joan is bound to become an embarrassment to the male-dominated world she has turned upside-down. And then what? —Shaw Festival

Joan’s religious fanaticism, reaching us through the perspective of 500 years and then filtered through Shaw’s imagination, becomes the protest of a plain-spoken individual conscience.” —The Guardian

“She had appeared to violate the rules. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted. And that persistence, deadlier than the kind that earned Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren her infamous rebuke, led directly to Joan’s death at the stake. —The Buffalo News

 Age Rating: PG-13 for mature content

Run Time: Approx. 2.5 hrs. including a 15-min. intermission

Post-Show Discussion: TBA

Sign Interpreted Performance: TBA

Frame/Works Panel Discussion: TBA

She Can, We Can: Be an Entrepreneur Everywhere @ Elliott University Center, Cone Ballroom
Aug 1 all-day
Student making a presentation
Entrepreneurship Everywhere student presentation

DATE TBA

She Can, We Can: Be an Entrepreneur Everywhere is a free symposium in the Cone Ballroom of the Elliott University Center at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro open to the campus and the public focusing on the idea that more women will succeed if they have business skills, knowledge, resources, and contacts. The symposium will feature successful women entrepreneurs to give tips, learning opportunities around what makes successful women entrepreneurs worldwide, development opportunities between students, emerging entrepreneurs, working entrepreneurs, business professionals and community organizations. Hear from the Entrepreneur Extraordinaire winner. Visit the display tables featuring women-owned businesses, family businesses, student, staff and alumni businesses, and organizations. Please join us for our complimentary sponsored networking reception open to all registered attendees! Food throughout the event! Self-pay parking is available in the Walker or Oakland parking decks

No charge for faculty, students, staff, or non-profit organizations. For-profit business tables are $25 for a table and one chair with self-pay parking. Register at this link.
She Did, We Can Too: Stories of our own students, alumni, and faculty who have contributed to gender equity and social justice @ Elliott University Center Maple Room
Aug 1 all-day

She Can We Can logo

DATE TBA

She Did, We Can Too brings alive stories of our alumni, students, and faculty who, throughout the life of our university, have contributed to the movement to secure gender and social justice as home, across the state, and nationally. Stories of these champions, based on our library’s archival material, will be dramatized by current UNCG students during the Vanguard Leadership Symposium (dates TBA). This event will also highlight how UNCG continues to be an active partner in advancing equity and justice. A reception to follow will draw attention to the richness of our library’s special collections. 

She Is… Date TBD @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day
Arlene Shrut headshot
Arlene Shrut

Art song is the beautiful combination of poetry and music that brings a story to life. She is…will explore many of the facets that make up a woman in a song recital by Teri Bickham and Arlene Shrut. The compositions of outstanding women composers will be performed to define and tell the story of a woman through song. She is…mother…friend…crier…screamer…comforter…fighter…survivor, and she is unstoppable. This event is free and open to the public.

Teri Bickham
Teri Bickham

 

Shoulder to Shoulder @ Mary Channing Coleman Building, Dance Theater
Aug 1 all-day
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian

DATE TBA

Choreographer-performers Eva Crystal and Halie Donabedian perform, Shoulder to Shoulder (2016), featuring two women supporting each other through the women’s suffrage movement. To develop movement, they researched the suffragist movement by exploring photographs, news accounts, and propaganda aiming to understand how the women in these visuals and stories supported each other and related to each other to achieve their goals. They analyzed the imagery using a form of movement analysis called Laban Movement Analysis and Ann Hutchinson Guest’s nineteen ways humans relate to each other. The choreographers recreated these relationships in movement, challenging each other physically and emotionally to keep going with the march toward the goal of equity for all people despite gender, sexual preference, or disability, and to support each other so they would not be forced to relinquish to a system of injustice continuously being re-broken. Today, while all adults may vote, they ask what next?

Shoulder to Shoulder @ Mary Channing Coleman Building, Dance Theater
Aug 1 all-day
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian

DATE TBA

Choreographer-performers Eva Crystal and Halie Donabedian perform, Shoulder to Shoulder (2016), featuring two women supporting each other through the women’s suffrage movement. To develop movement, they researched the suffragist movement by exploring photographs, news accounts, and propaganda aiming to understand how the women in these visuals and stories supported each other and related to each other to achieve their goals. They analyzed the imagery using a form of movement analysis called Laban Movement Analysis and Ann Hutchinson Guest’s nineteen ways humans relate to each other. The choreographers recreated these relationships in movement, challenging each other physically and emotionally to keep going with the march toward the goal of equity for all people despite gender, sexual preference, or disability, and to support each other so they would not be forced to relinquish to a system of injustice continuously being re-broken. Today, while all adults may vote, they ask what next?

Shoulder to Shoulder @ Mary Channing Coleman Building, Dance Theater
Aug 1 all-day
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian
Eva Crystal, Halie Donabedian

DATE TBA

Choreographer-performers Eva Crystal and Halie Donabedian perform, Shoulder to Shoulder (2016), featuring two women supporting each other through the women’s suffrage movement. To develop movement, they researched the suffragist movement by exploring photographs, news accounts, and propaganda aiming to understand how the women in these visuals and stories supported each other and related to each other to achieve their goals. They analyzed the imagery using a form of movement analysis called Laban Movement Analysis and Ann Hutchinson Guest’s nineteen ways humans relate to each other. The choreographers recreated these relationships in movement, challenging each other physically and emotionally to keep going with the march toward the goal of equity for all people despite gender, sexual preference, or disability, and to support each other so they would not be forced to relinquish to a system of injustice continuously being re-broken. Today, while all adults may vote, they ask what next?

Stereotypes, Struggles and Successes: Tracing the journey of interior design as a gendered practice @ TBD
Aug 1 all-day

She Can We Can Beyond Women's Suffrage Centennial

DATE TBA

The Department of Interior Architecture began as a cluster of courses in the School of Home Economics at the “Women’s College” that was UNCG. Established as a place and kind of knowledge, particularly for the advancement of women, interior design has grown into an inclusive, supportive, and helping field that attracts a diverse population focused on the creation of the human environments. Since the interior is both the location and the vehicle for the expression of identity, Interior Architecture and Design are lively and important locations for the consideration of gender, identity, diversity and empowerment. As part of the “She Can, We Can” project for 2020-21, the Department of Interior Architecture will explore and celebrate those narratives by sponsoring a symposium that will consider a thematic exploration of the role gender and identity politics have played in the creation, evolution, and current teaching and practice of creating interiors.

Summit on Access & Equity in the Early Care & Education System @ Alumni House, Virginia Dare Room
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

This Summit will address the critical role that quality, affordable, and accessible childcare plays in promoting women’s career and economic self-sufficiency and success. Participants will learn about challenges that parents and caregivers face with regard to accessing quality, affordable childcare, as well as to build collaborative solutions to increasing this access at the local, state, and national levels.The program will include a mix of speakers, panel discussions, small-group discussions, and TED-inspired talks. Participants will focus on identifying action steps for building solutions to the problems discussed throughout the Summit to strengthen our early childhood education systems, including action steps at the local, state, and national levels.Breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snacks will be provided to all participants.

This event is free but requires registration (at ticket link above).

Symphonie Fantastique @ Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra

Dmitry Sitkovetsky, conductor
Ingrid Fliter, piano
Brahms Academic Festival Overture
Chopin Piano Concerto No. 2
Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

Relive the folly of your college-aged youth with the greatest student music of all time. Brahms’s Academic Festival Overture, while written long after his college days, is based on German fraternity drinking songs. Chopin, already a piano prodigy, completed his Piano Concerto No. 2 while still a student with help from his classmates in Warsaw. Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique is a hallucinatory love letter, of sorts, to a college crush from his days at the Paris Conservatoire. 

 

Tchaikovsky and Beethoven Treasures @ Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts
Aug 1 all-day

Greensboro SymphonyDATE TBA

Join the Greensboro Symphony as we continue a worldwide celebration of Beethoven’s 250th birthday in 2020! Enjoy Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony, which the composer himself considered one of his best works. Lighting the candles is Glinka’s fiery Ruslan and Ludmila overture—then, international star pianist and Cliburn Competition gold-medal laureate Olga Kern performs Tchaikovsky’s timeless Piano Concerto No. 1.

Olga Kern, pianist, photographed by Chris Lee at Steinway Hall, 12/9/13.

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra

Dmitry Sitkovetsky, conductor
Olga Kern, piano
Glinka Overture to Ruslan and Ludmila
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1
Beethoven Symphony No. 7

The Red Record
Aug 1 all-day
Michael Frierson headshot
Michael Frierson

The Red Record, a short dance film on the life and work of Ida Bell Wells (1862-1931), African American feminist, journalist, abolitionist and women’s suffrage leader. The film will be a provocative piece that resonates with contemporary issues of race, gender and inclusion in a contested election year. The project brings together the talents of composer Ariel Pocock (Music), Robin Gee (Dance, and Michael Frierson (Media Studies) and Kevin Wells (Media Studies).

Ariel Pocock head shot
Ariel Pocock
Robin Gee head shot
Robin Gee
What’s the T? Making Space for Transgender Lives on Campus and Beyond – Transgender Care 101 @ Elliott University Center Dail Room
Aug 1 all-day

DATE TBA

What’s the T? Making Space for Transgender Lives on Campus and Beyond is a series of three events starting with Transgender Care 101.

J. Wesley Thompson
J. Wesley Thompson, MHS, PA-C

What are the challenges and barriers facing trans communities seeking access to healthcare in the United States? To kick off our trans speaker series for Fall 2020, come learn from a leading trans healthcare provider, J. Wesley Thompson, MHS, PA-C of the Amity Medical Group in Charlotte, NC to understand basic terminology, evolving healthcare issues, and to learn more about the future of transgender care.

 

Women Navigating 21st Century Academia @ EUC Auditorium
Aug 1 all-day

She Can We Can logo

DATE TBA

Despite efforts to close gender disparities in academia, women who pursue careers in academia often confront challenges and make tough decisions on this path, such as considering whether and when to have children and when to do this in a way that is most conducive to their career success or managing family care obligations (which still often fall to women to shoulder) in order to attend conferences and other professional development activities. At this event, we will hear from women across disciplines and career stages who have found success in academia despite these challenges and discuss what solutions can be enacted to better address the needs of women to navigate and find success in the academy.

m

Women of Note: A Performance Celebrating American Heroes-DATE TBD @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day
Group pic of Women in the Women's Wind Ensemble
Erika Boysen-flute, Mary Ashley Barret-oboe, Kelly Burke-clarinet, Susan Fancher-saxophone Ab Pack-horn, Rebecca Libera-bassoon, Inara Zandmane-piano

In furtherance of promoting up-and-coming women composers as well as highlighting and honoring important American women, we are pleased to announce the Women of Note Composition Competition. The winning compositions will be performed by the Women’s Wind Ensemble as part of, “She Can, We Can: Beyond the Women’s Suffrage Centennial.” Our four composers to be showcased on date TBD in UNCG’s Tew Recital Hall are:  Alexis LambShuying LiEmily McPherson, and Harriet Steinke.

This lecture-recital will also include discussions on the important contributions made by each of the women represented in the winning compositions. The composers will consider the women who surfaced during the campaign for Women on the Twenty Dollar Bill. The Women’s Wind Ensemble (WWE) was formed in 2017 with the intent to showcase combinations of small and medium-sized wind chamber ensembles. Comprised of all female musicians, the WWE embraces opportunities to feature works by women composers and to encourage all young musicians to find their creative voices.

Women of the Bible: A Voice of Their Own – Date TBD @ UNCG School of Music, Tew Recital Hall
Aug 1 all-day
Teri Bickham
Kelly Balmaceda
Kelly Balmaceda

The women of the Bible have been celebrated through word, song, and ceremony for thousands of years. Their lessons have been taught, and although times have changed, their examples of courage and strength still resonate. Throughout the Bible their voices speak of wonder and creation, setting the oppressed free, strengthening the weak, and the power of love. Sopranos Teri Bickham and Kelly Balmaceda, and mezzo sopranos Sandra Kreuger and Amanda Crider will explore their words in a recital that weaves the power of the solo voice with the seamless blending of voices together. The broad influence of their words will be represented in the variety of repertoire sung, including works by Andrea Ramsey, Jake Heggie, Henry Purcell, and Pablo Casals. Through the power of song, the women of the Bible will come to life with a voice of their own. This event is free and open to the public.

Sandra Krueger headshot
Sandra Krueger
Queer Multi-racial Political Organizers and Electoral Politics in North Carolina @ TBD
Aug 1 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

She Can We Can logo

DATE TBA

The Program in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies in partnership with local queer and multi-racial community allies comes together for a panel conversation about the role of electoral politics in combating the issues most plaguing communities in North Carolina. The election of the current presidential administration has been demonstrative of the importance of some form of participation in the legal system to protect people and create sets of demands on representative governance structures, even if this is not the primary or comprehensive answer to struggles for justice and equity. There are many policies supported by both Democrats and Republicans that continue to create sweeping injustices across the nation. This panel brings organizers together beyond the university walls to discuss this issue and provide a unique opportunity for our students to learn how to become involved in politics that affect real lives in their communities.

This event is free and open to the public.

ELF @ Taylor Theatre
Aug 1 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

ELF

Book by Thomas Meehan

Music & Lyrics by Chad Beguelin and Mathew Sklar

Buddy, a young orphan, mistakenly crawls into Santa’s bag of gifts and is transported to the North Pole. The would-be elf is raised, unaware that he is actually a human until his enormous size and poor toy-making abilities cause him to face the truth. With Santa’s permission, Buddy embarks on a journey to New York City to find his birth father and discover his true identity. Faced with the harsh realities that his father is on the naughty list and his half-brother doesn’t even believe in Santa, Buddy is determined to win over his new family and help New York remember the true meaning of Christmas. This modern-day holiday classic is sure to make everyone embrace their inner elf. After all, the best way to spread Christmas Cheer is singing loud for all to hear.  —Musical Theatre International

“A merry treat for the holiday season…A cheerful, melodic score by Matthew Sklar, the composer, and Chad Beguelin, the lyricist, keeps the show rolling along.”

The New York Times

Elf the Musical teaches about trust, the importance of family, and the pay-it-forward effects of positivity and joy.” —DC Metro Theatre Arts

“Elf The Musical is happy enough for families, savvy enough for city kids, and plenty smart for adults!”

Variety

Elf The Musical Is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI.  www.mtishows.com

A North Carolina Theatre for Young People production

Age Rating: PG
Run Time: Approx. 2.5 hrs. including a 15-min. intermission
Post-Show Discussion: TBA
Sign Interpreted Performance: TBA

For information about bringing your group to student matinee performances, please contact Group Sales at (336) 334-4015 or grpsales@uncg.edu.

 

 

 

SKELETON CREW By Dominique Morisseau @ Sprinkle Theatre (Brown Building)
Aug 1 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

At the start of the Great Recession, one of the last auto stamping plants in Detroit is on shaky ground. Each of the workers have to make choices on how to move forward if their plant goes under. Shanita has to decide how she’ll support herself and her unborn child, Faye has to decide how and where she’ll live, and Dez has to figure out how to make his ambitious dreams a reality. Power dynamics shift as their manager Reggie is torn between doing right by his work family, and by the red tape in his office. Powerful and tense, Skeleton Crew is the third of Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit cycle trilogy. ⁠—Samuel French

Ms. Morisseau works her big themes on a small, closely patterned canvas.’” — The New York Times

“In “Skeleton Crew,” the American worker, cranky, caring, overburdened and endangered, is given her 21st century dramatic due.” —L.A. Times

“Skeleton Crew” is presented by arrangement with Concord Theatricals on behalf of Samuel French, Inc. www.concordtheatricals.com

Age Rating: PG-13 for mature content

Run Time: Approx. 2 hrs. with a 15 min. intermission

Post-Show Discussion: TBD

Frame/Works Panel Discussion: TBD

Aug
28
Sat
2021
Geena Davis @ UNCG Auditorium
Aug 28 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series: Geena Davis

Geena Davis headshot
Geena Davis

Few have achieved such remarkable success in as many different fields as Davis has: she is not only an Oscar and Golden Globe-winning actor but also a world-class athlete (at one time the nation’s 13th-ranked archer), a member of the genius society Mensa, and is now recognized for her tireless advocacy of women and girls nearly as much as for her acting accomplishments. She is the Founder and Chair of the non-profit Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, which engages film and television creators to increase dramatically the percentages of female characters — and reduce gender stereotyping — in media made for children 11 and under.

Davis was appointed Special Envoy for Women and Girls in ICT for the UN’s International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and is an official partner of UN Women. She is also co-founder and chair of the Bentonville Film Festival (BFF), whose mission is to champion women and diverse voices in all forms of media. Read full article at https://vpa.uncg.edu/single-event/geena-davis/

Sep
1
Wed
2021
Denice Frohman: A Woman’s Place Performance @ Elliott University Center Auditorium
Sep 1 all-day
Denice Frohman
Denice Frohman
Photo (Credit – Nicholas Nichols)

Postponed until Fall 2021, Date TBA

Denice Frohman’s poem, “A Woman’s Place” has empowered many women around the world, and inspired individuals to take a proud stance on their roles as women in society. As a poet, educator, and performer, Denice is a CantoMundo Fellow, a former Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, named “Top 20 Emerging LGBT Leader” by the Philadelphia Gay Newspaper, and her work has been featured in the anthology, Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism. Denice co-organized #PoetsforPuertoRico and has received support from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures. In an afternoon workshop, Denice will work with students on how to flip the traditional script of how poets and artists are often told, in overt and subtle ways, that our histories, languages, traditions, rituals, and queerness are not worth writing about. An evening performance will feature Denice’s works, the topics discussed in the workshop, and UNCG students performances inspired by her work and cause. This event is free and open to the public.

Denice Frohman: A Woman’s Place Workshop @ Elliott University Center Auditorium
Sep 1 all-day
Denice Frohman
Denice Frohman
Photo Credit – Nicholas Nichols

Postponed until Fall 2021, Date TBA

Denice Frohman’s poem, “A Woman’s Place” has empowered many women around the world, and inspired individuals to take a proud stance on their roles as women in society. As a poet, educator, and performer, Denice is a CantoMundo Fellow, a former Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion, named “Top 20 Emerging LGBT Leader” by the Philadelphia Gay Newspaper, and her work has been featured in the anthology, Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism. Denice co-organized #PoetsforPuertoRico and has received support from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures. In an afternoon workshop, Denice will work with students on how to flip the traditional script of how poets and artists are often told, in overt and subtle ways, that our histories, languages, traditions, rituals, and queerness are not worth writing about. An evening performance will feature Denice’s works, the topics discussed in the workshop, and UNCG students performances inspired by her work and cause. The performance begins at 7:00 pm, in the Elliott University Center Auditorium and is free and open to the public.

The Gendered Nature of Weight Bias @ TBA
Sep 1 all-day

She Can We Can logo

DATE IN SEPTEMBER TBA

Does your weight define your worth?  When asked this question most of us would answer with a resounding NO but everywhere we turn (television, social media, fitness centers) society gives us a different message-the thin ideal.  Weight bias, also known as weight stigma, is discrimination or stereotyping based on a person’s weight. Weight bias is associated with adverse psychological and physical health outcomes. Although all individuals are vulnerable to weight-based discrimination, women and marginalized genders experience higher rates of weight bias and at smaller body sizes than their male counterparts.   In order to raise awareness of this important issue, the UNCG Nutrition Department will be hosting experts in the areas of weight inclusive healthcare and advocates of the body acceptance movement for a panel discussion on the Gendered Nature of Weight Bias.  Potential topics the panel will cover are thin privilege, patriarchal oppression, intersectionality, and advocating for change.   

Sep
24
Fri
2021
Margaret Atwood @ UNCG Auditorium
Sep 24 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series: Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood headshot
Margaret Atwood

Atwood, whose work has been published in more than forty-five countries, is the author of more than fifty books of fiction, poetry, critical essays, and graphic novels. Her latest novel, The Testaments, is a co-winner of the 2019 Booker Prize. It is the long-awaited sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale, now an award-winning TV series.

Margaret Atwood will speak during the 2nd half of the evening. The first half will feature collaborative art created by UNCG faculty and students, that have been inspired by her works, including music, poetry, dance, and theatre.

Read more about her other works at https://vpa.uncg.edu/single-event/margaret-atwood/

Oct
2
Sat
2021
Spokes & Votes: Pedaling the Path to Democracy for All @ Greensboro History Museum
Oct 2 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Come celebrate how bicycling transforms communities in a day-long celebration of the revolutionary impact of the bicycle on the women’s movement of the early 20th century. A community bike-ride of Greensboro’s three historical women’s colleges will be followed by a day-long celebration of this legacy, featuring a costume contest, a bike rodeo, a history exhibit, and much more! There will be something for everyone: make your own suffrage sash, get registered to vote, learn about the past, go for a family-friendly bike ride. Join us in this community celebration!

Poster, Spokes & Votes    RAIN DATE: OCTOBER 9, 2021

Oct
8
Fri
2021
Sphinx Virtuosi @ Tew Recital Hall
Oct 8 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series: Sphinx Virtuosi

Sphinx Virtuosi group photoThe Sphinx Virtuosi are the nation’s most dynamic, exhilarating professional chamber orchestra, dedicated to increasing racial and ethnic diversity in classical music. Comprised of eighteen of the nation’s top Black and Latinx classical soloists, the Virtuosi are primarily alumni of the internationally renowned Sphinx Competition, and its members work together as cultural ambassadors reaching new audiences. Read more about Sphinx Virtousi at https://vpa.uncg.edu/single-event/sphinx-virtuosi/

Oct
29
Fri
2021
Shana Tucker @ Tew Recital Hall
Oct 29 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series: Shana Tucker

Shana Tucker
Shana Tucker

Shana is a recipient of several awards through local arts councils, including United Arts Council (Raleigh, NC) and two Nevada Arts Council grants, one of which is the prestigious Artist Fellowship for her exemplary work as a Performing Artist. She serves on review panels and advisory committees for arts organizations across the country, including United Arts (Raleigh, NC), South Arts (Atlanta, GA), and Nevada Arts Council (Carson City, NV).

Shana is a board member for Blair Publisher (formerly Carolina Wren Press), a North Carolina-based small-press organization that publishes diverse minority writers of quality fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and children’s literature. She also serves on the advisory board for the Washington Women in Jazz Festival, an annual event in Washington, DC, celebrates and promotes women jazz artists through concerts, jam sessions, lectures, panel discussions, masterclasses, and a young artist competition. Read more about Shana at https://vpa.uncg.edu/single-event/shana-tucker/

 

Jan
14
Fri
2022
Kelli O’Hara @ UNCG Auditorium
Jan 14 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series: Kelli O’Hara

Kelli O'Hara picStage and screen star Kelli O’Hara has established herself as one of Broadway’s greatest leading ladies. Her portrayal of Anna Leonowens in The King and I garnered her the 2015 Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical, along with Grammy, Drama League, Outer Critics, and Oliver nominations. She reprised the role while making her West End debut and performed a limited engagement at Tokyo’s Orb Theatre. Read more about Kelli at https://vpa.uncg.edu/single-event/kelli-ohara/

Feb
1
Tue
2022
Denise Murrell (Spring 2022-date TBD) @ TBD
Feb 1 all-day

Denise Murrell Head shot

Presented by UNC Greensboro Concert and Lecture Series

Dr. Denise Murrell is Associate Curator of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Dr. Murrell’s scholarship brings to light overlooked narratives within the history of art. Her recent exhibition, Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet to Matisse and Beyond, received critical acclaim when presented at Columbia University’s Wallach Art Gallery, and was subsequently expanded for a presentation at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Born in New York, but raised in Gastonia, North Carolina, Dr. Murrell was originally a student of economics, earning an MBA from Harvard working with high-profile finance companies, before deciding to study art history. Driven by a desire to understand the different contexts in which artists have presented black figures in their work, she went on to take not just a few courses, but to complete her PhD at Columbia and publish her first book with Yale University Press.

An advocate for mentorship programs and supporting minority scholars, Dr. Murrell currently serves on the National Advisory Board for the Ackland Art Museum at UNC Chapel Hill and ArtTable, a leadership organization for professional women in the visual arts. Her UCLS talk is presented jointly by UNCG’s College of Visual and Performing Arts, Falk Visiting Artist Program, and the Weatherspoon Art Museum.

The North Carolina Theatre for Young People’s 2022 Touring Production: The Smartest Girl in the World by Miriam Gonzales @ Various see details below
Feb 1 – Apr 29 all-day

The Smartest Girl in The World The Smartest Girl in the World, North Carolina Theatre for Young People’s 2022 touring production by DC-based Latinx playwright Miriam Gonzales, will reach over 15,000 young people as it performs in elementary and middle schools across North Carolina and beyond. SHE CAN, WE CAN funding is supporting the production as it tours five Title I schools in Guilford County, including The Doris Henderson Newcomers School. A story that explores the power of a young immigrant girl changing her world, this poignant play inspires us all to redefine who we are. Loyalty, determination, vision, and family are at the heart of a play that will reshape not only how we view young girls, but also how we view ourselves.

Date(s) and time(s) TBD based on school bookings for the 2022 NCTYP tour (Tu/Tr mornings in elementary/middle school venues FEB – APRIL and on Taylor Theatre main stage for one week in March)

Location(s): The Doris Henderson Newcomers School, 411 Friendway Road, Greensboro, NC 27410

Additional locations TBD