This considerable interdisciplinary effort includes many courses which reflect our theme, some habitual and some new:

Fall 2020 Courses:

Women in Antiquity – CCI 330
Instructor:  Dr. Rebecca Muich

Rebecca Muich

Women in Antiquity considers the lives of women in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds in much the same way we do today.  We will examine an astonishing array of information about the lives of women in antiquity that has survived for us today, including art, literature, records, treatises, laws, spaces, found household and religious items, and much, much more.  As we sift through the evidence that antiquity has left behind, students will be encouraged to examine it through our modern frameworks focusing on gender, oppression, and equity. 

 

 

 

 


Women’s Suffrage, Civil Rights, and Equality in America – CST 460
Instructors:  Dr. Jenni Simon, Dr. Jody Natalle

Three black women in front of Capitol BuildingAs we embark on the centennial celebration of women’s suffrage in the United States, CST 460: Women’s Suffrage, Civil Rights, and Equality in America is designed to provide students with opportunities for reflection on the social impact of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution. This junior to senior level course engages suffrage movement rhetoric from a rhetorical perspective. Students will study suffrage vocabulary, rhetoric, and the respective suffrage rhetors as a means of exploring the role of citizenship and (dis)enfranchisement in the United states. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and critically reflect upon the intersections among movements (Abolition, Suffrage, and Temperance) and explore the arc of equal rights in the United States from both historical (15th Amendment, 19th Amendment) and contemporary (1965 Voting Rights Act, gerrymandering, Supreme Court decisions) contexts.


Topics in American History: “Southern Women’s History” – HIS 213
Instructor:  Dr. Mandy Cooper

What does southern history look like when women’s experiences and actions are placed at the center? This course will seek to answer this question by exploring the history of women in the U.S. South from pre-colonial times to the present. Students will examine the changing experiences and expectations of southern women and how these experiences and expectations were continually shaped by the intersections of gender, race, and class. The course will pay particular attention to the subjects of women and slavery, the impact of the Civil War on gender relations, the changing meaning of race and class in women’s lives, women’s suffrage in the South, and the Civil Rights Movement.


U.S. Women’s History to 1865 – HIS 328
Instructor:  Dr. Mandy Cooper

A history of women in the U.S. to the Civil War. Topics include Native American gender systems, midwives, witchcraft, women’s labor and education, families, slavery, and social reform.


Topics in Historical Memory: “LGBTQ History and Public Memory” – HIS 346
Instructor:  Dr. Anne Parsons

In this interactive class, students will learn about the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transexual, and queer identities and people in the United States over the last 100 years. The class will explore how activists have reclaimed this history to advance the movement for equality and to improve the health and wellbeing of LGBTQ people. Students will also learn about controversies over public memory that have emerged over marking LGBTQ historic sites and teaching LGBTQ history in museums and K-12 schools.


Gender and History: “Women and Politics in U.S. History” – HIS 451/551
Instructor:  Dr. Mandy Cooper

This course examines the history of women’s involvement in politics in the United States from the founding to the present. Women of all ethnicities, races, classes, and sexualities have always been involved in politics through a wide range of political activities – as citizens, voters, activists. This course will examine women’s historical role in the political process, the different ways that women have engaged as political actors (even when disenfranchised), and the issues that became defined as women’s issues.


Minerva’s Wisdom: Philosophy, Science, and Race in World History? – HSS 212
Instructor:  Dr. Omar Ali

Student holding Spartan helmet, posing in front of Minerva Statue
Tsion Hailu

The Honors seminar explores philosophy, science, and race in world history centered on “Minerva’s Wisdom,” the year-long campus-wide interactive photography project. Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom, is based not only on Athena, the Greek goddess, but Neith, the Egyptian goddess. What is the history of this female deity and the various ideas she has come to symbolize?

Sponsored by Lloyd International Honors College

 

 

 


Knowledge and the Arts in 19th-century Europe and Latin America – LLC 355
Instructor:  Dr. Veronica Grossi

Gustave Caillebotte painting of people strolling in Paris under umbrellas
Gustave Caillebotte, 1877

What was it like to live in a city like Paris, Moscow, Mexico City or Bogotá, Colombia in the 19th century, a period of great technological changes, social shifts, political agitation and debate? In this course we will travel to a distant cultural universe to investigate the habits, pursuits, struggles and ideals of a rapidly changing society as well as the legacies we have inherited of that period of intense crisis, transformation and innovation.

Course focuses on 19th-century arts, including the role of women in domestic and public spaces.


Musical Theatre Workshop – THR 349
Instructor:  Ms. Erin Speer

Picture of instructor E. Speer
Erin Speer

Exploring production numbers from Musicals with feminist themes and/or characters and pairing limited presentations of classroom work with readings and discussions tied to Stacy Wolf’s excellent work, Changed for Good: A Feminist History of the Broadway Musical.

 

 

 

 

 


Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies – WGS 250
Instructor:  Dr. Carrie Hart

Logo for WGS 250 Group of womenThis course introduces students to Women’s and Gender Sexuality Studies and facilitates nuanced consideration of contemporary debates within and beyond the field. Students learn to trouble dominant scripts about gender, distinguish gender from sex and sexuality, and identify the ways in the parameters of these concepts are developed, reinforced and challenged within institutional practice and daily life.

 

 


Introduction to LGBTQI Studies – WGS 270
Instructor:  Dr. Danielle Bouchard

Poster of LGBTTQQIAAP and meaning of each letterThis course fundamentally questions common definitions of sexuality as a biological drive or unchanging identity, by looking at a variety of authors, artists, and organizers who see sexuality as a way in which individuals are made socially intelligible, as a way in which knowledge is produced and organized, and as the site of both profound social regulation and resistance to social norms.

 

 


Judaism and the Construction of Gender WGS 312
Instructor:  Dr. Ellen Haskell

This course explores Jewish understandings of gender from ancient to modern times, with focus on law and tradition, roles in the Jewish community, family, sexuality, and Jewish theology.


Postcolonial and Transnational Feminisms – WGS 333
Instructor:  Dr. Daniel Coleman

This course is an introduction to borderlands theory and critical brown studies from feminist and queer lenses. We will begin with a study of the U.S.-Mexico border through queer Chicana feminism and its implications for Chicanx and Latinx populations in the United States. We then broaden our discussion to include Southeast Asian brown scholars and border theory beyond the US-Mexico formation.


Introduction to Feminist Theories – WGS 350
Instructor:  Dr. Sarah Cervenak

Instructor S. Cervenak head sho
Sarah Cervenak

In this course, we will engage with feminist theory as an ongoing, inter-disciplinary formation. We approach feminist theory not as a static epistemological lens but rather a way of engaging with everyday life that is open to endless revision and innovation.

 

 

 

 

 


Ecofeminism – WGS 374
Instructor:  Dr. Gwen Hunnicutt

Ecofeminism class poster -Picture of the woodsThis course explores Ecofeminism, which is a philosophy and social movement that focuses on the interconnections between feminism and environmental justice. Ecofeminism analyzes how the same paradigms and historical inequalities devalue and oppress both ‘women,’ ‘Othered bodies’ and ‘nature.’

 

 

 

 

 


Feminist Theory: Intersections of Gender, Race and Class   – WGS 650
Instructor:  Dr. Danielle Bouchard

This course treats theory as an active process of knowledge production and world-making that we all practice. It is designed, in part, to give you a sense of what’s out there—who’s talking about what, how they are talking about it, and why—as well as to explore the ways in which feminism itself has often been enabled and legitimated by those concepts and institutions which have been the objects of its profoundest critique.


Gender & Sexuality in 20th Century US Women’s Sports   – WGS 706
Instructor:  Dr. Lisa Levenstein

Female tennis player hitting a ballThis course will explore struggles over gender, race, and sexuality in twentieth-century US women’s sports. We will study battles for respect and inclusion, including recent controversies over transgender athletes and demands for equal pay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2021 Courses:

Communication and Gendered Communities – CST 659
Instructor: Dr. Cerise Glenn

Instructor C. Glenn headshot
Dr. Cerise Glenn

 

We will examine gendered communication dynamics in a variety of diverse communities. Contexts examined include family spaces, workplace dynamics, and mediated networks. Intersectional approaches will be used that connect gender with other aspects of social identity, such as racial/ethnic background, nationality, and socio-economic status.

 

 

 

 


Women Seen and Heard: Twentieth-Century Audiovisual Cultures in the U.S. and Russia/Soviet Union – MUS 3xx-6xx

Instructor: Dr. Joan Titus

Joan Titus head shotIn this course, we will examine how feminism operated alongside audiovisual cultures in Russia and the United States for the past 100 years. Ultimately, the course will provide students with an understanding of the complexity of cultural politics, with specific reference to audiovisual media, in two countries that have complementary understandings of women and musical culture.

 

 

 

 


Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies – WGS 250
Instructor:  Dr. Carrie Hart

Logo for WGS 250 Group of womenThis course introduces students to Women’s and Gender Sexuality Studies and facilitates nuanced consideration of contemporary debates within and beyond the field. Students learn to trouble dominant scripts about gender, distinguish gender from sex and sexuality, and identify the ways in the parameters of these concepts are developed, reinforced and challenged within institutional practice and daily life.

 

 


Introduction to LGBTQI Studies – WGS 270
Instructor: TBD

Poster of LGBTTQQIAAP and meaning of each letterThis course fundamentally questions common definitions of sexuality as a biological drive or unchanging identity, by looking at a variety of authors, artists, and organizers who see sexuality as a way in which individuals are made socially intelligible, as a way in which knowledge is produced and organized, and as the site of both profound social regulation and resistance to social norms.

 

 


Postcolonial and Transnational Feminisms – WGS 333
Instructor:  Dr. Daniel Coleman

This course is an introduction to borderlands theory and critical brown studies from feminist and queer lenses. We will begin with a study of the U.S.-Mexico border through queer Chicana feminism and its implications for Chicanx and Latinx populations in the United States.


Introduction to Feminist Theories – WGS 350
Instructor: Dr. Danielle Bouchard

This course engages with feminist theory as an ongoing, inter-disciplinary formation.  We approach feminist theory not as a static epistemological lens but rather a way of engaging with everyday life that is open to endless revision and innovation.


Critical Sexuality Studies & Queer Theory – WGS 430/530
Instructor: Dr. Danielle Bouchard

This course examines the formation of sexualized and gendered bodies and identities both within and against the institutions, political orientations, and beliefs that are most invested in that normativity.


Senior Capstone – WGS 490
Instructor:  Dr. Sarah Cervenak

Instructor S. Cervenak head sho
Dr. Sarah Cervenak

This course provides WGSS majors and minors with the time and space to consider their work and development at UNCG and to be part of a serious community of peers that can serve as the basis for a self-reflective and self-critical engagement with feminism and allied areas of inquiry.

 

 

 

 

 


Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Internship Seminar  – WGS 602
Instructor:  Dr. Lisa Levenstein

This seminar provides students with the opportunity to think critically about their WGSS internships and make connections between their experiences off-campus and their academic learning.


Feminist Research Analysis – WGS 651
Instructor: Dr. Daniel Coleman

This course explores feminist approaches to philosophical and practical inquiries. Students are prepared to critically read research in order to understand the place of gender in lived experiences and institutional spaces.


“Women, Lit, and #popculture” – WGS 706
Instructor: Dr. Maria Sanchez

This course will examine how contemporary women use popular culture, especially through social media forms such Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, fan fiction platforms and others, to circumvent or augment traditional, established forms of creating and disseminating literature.